Migrating new features with Fork CMS

You've spent the last few weeks working on this brand new feature for your fancy website and it looks amazing! You and your peers thoroughly tested everything, so it's time to deploy this feature to production. You deploy your project with the Fork CMS Capistrano gem and everything seems to go well.

When checking the production website you suddenly encounter a 500 error! Not sure what went wrong, you quickly revert your feature and deploy again. All is well... You import the production database to your local system and start debugging, only to find out you forgot to add that database field you added a week ago.

Sound familiar?

New CK Finder license

If you have ever linked a file, or uploaded an image in an editor in Fork CMS you probably didn't noticed it, but in fact you have used the CKFinder-plugin for CKEditor. CKFinder isn't open-source, so in the past Figure8, SumoCoders and Wijs have sponsored the OEM license.

Recently we wanted to upgrade to a more recent version of CKFinder, so we had to renew the OEM license. Bubblefish, Figure8, SumoCoders and Wijs were so kind to sponsor the license for this year.

As the license is renewed a new key is in place, and this one should be used from now on. As long as you don't upgrade the CKFinder you won't notice anything.

We would like to thank Bubblefish, Figure8, SumoCoders and Wijs for sponsoring the OEM license!

Using Redis in Fork to cache large amounts of data

We needed to create a (huge) webshop in Fork CMS, depending on external software for its ten thousands of products and categories. Unfortunately that external database was missing important tree-structure information about how the website should show categories and its products. That's why we needed fast caching using Redis.

Registry hackaton 24/04/2016

  • Written by Jesse Dobbelaere on Thursday 28 April 2016
  • 2 comments

Developers using Fork CMS are constantly looking on how to improve the cms. Ideas such as a marketplace for modules & themes have been on the roadmap for quite a while. The extensions page on the Fork CMS website has grown a lot and lacks several useful features. A revamped Fork CMS extensions app would certainly play a big part in the future of Fork CMS.

Fork Meetup 26/03/2015

Yesterday, thursday 26 March 2015, we finally organized another event. The previous real event was somewhat about 2 years ago. This meetup was Symfony-flavoured, as many people wanted an update about the move towards Symfony. So yesterday we gathered in the Combell-offices in Ghent, to talk about Fork and Symfony.

New GitHub labels

You may have noticed that we cleaned up the labels we use for issues/pull requests on GitHub. We now follow the same structure as the Symfony repository.

Forkathon: introducing tests!

  • Written by Tijs Verkoyen on Saturday 28 February 2015
  • 2 comments

At 26 february 2015 Wijs and Sumocoders teamed up to work a full day on improving Fork CMS. We gathered in a room and started coding, some developers paired to fix issues, others reviewed the Pull Requests, while other were integrating tests!

Sitelinks search box

Since our 3.8.5 release, we've added a nice new feature for the marketing focussed sites build on Fork CMS. Google's Sitelinks Search box has been added. This snippet makes sure users will be able to use the search functionality from your Fork CMS website in the search results from Google itself.

Input wanted: Changing a profile's password

  • Written by Dieter Wyns on Wednesday 28 January 2015
  • 5 comments

Our core technical people have a meeting each month to discuss new implementations, merge pull-requests and view open issues. Last meeting in December, while reviewing the pull-requests we came across an implementation of Jeroen Desloovere about notifying profiles, see #971.

His changes would affect the way you can edit profiles in the backend. It adds new settings which allow an admin and the profile to get notified when a profile changes. A nice new feature!

During the review we stumbled into a new discussion about the functionality of changing passwords of a profile in the backend. Some argued it would be enough if you could reset a password. In this way the administrator would never know the password of a profile which is a very nice security principle.

What do you think, should an administrator be able to edit a password? Or just have the ability to do a reset?